All levels and styles taught From beginners to advanced All ages welcome from 5 years up Fun lessons with friendly experienced teacher

FAQS

What is the best age to start learning to play the piano

I teach students from the age of 5. Some children are more mature than others at this age and it really depends on their ability to focus on particular tasks for a period of time. I use a mixture of musical games, apps and listening activities alongside the playing which enage the student and make the lesson a fun, educational and rewarding experience. Many people decide to take up the piano inlater life or return to lessons after having a family, retirement etc. I can tailor the lessons to fit your individual situation and make sure you get what you want to out of it, whether you have a particular goal, or just wish to play or your own enjoyment. How often should I practice the piano This is a difficult question to answer as it varies from person to person. The most imporant thing is to make your practise as regular as possible. Ideally for younger children something like 10 minutes per day will result in a positive progression. As they get a little bit older then this can be increased. Finding a way of fitting it into the daily routine so that the motiviation to practise is maintained will be beneficial. Practisincg effectively is also imporant to make the most out of the time and will yield greater results than just playing the pieces through from start to finish each time. For adults, the pressures of life such as work, family, social events, can make finding a regular practise time tricky, but again trying to practise little and often rather than one big session just before a lesson will be much better.

Do I have to take exams

Sitting formal exams such as the ABRSM Exams (Associated Board of the Royal Schools of Music) is entirely up to you. Exams can be a great way to provide motivation, and a continual development path as you learn the piano. Apart from bringing pieces up to a high standard of performance, they also include technical elements such as scales, sight reading, and aural tests. For those that wish to sit ABRSM exams, I am very happy to focus lessons towards this but equally it is absolutely your choice whether to follow an exam route or not.  For younger students looking to study at university, music exams can earn UCAS points towards your application.

Are Scales important

Yes scales, arpeggios, and other exercises help to develop technique, strenghten fingers and become familliar with playing in different keys. They should form a warm-up at the start of each practise session and over time will enable you to play fast, accurately and in a relaxed manner. Think of them as the equivalent of warm-ups and training in the gym done by athletes to keep them in shape.

Does it matter it I have a real piano, electric piano, or keyboard

Ideally an accoustic piano or high quality digital piano is best, but a keyboard is fine to start off with before you make the comittment to invest in a piano. The advantage of a digital piano is that you can practise with headphones, they are more portable and don’t require tuning, however they will never completely replicate the touch and feel of an accoustic piano. If you ave a real piano, ideally it should be tuned 2 or 3 times a year depending on how much is is played.

Can I choose which music to play

Yes I actively encourage students to let me know if there are particular pieces or styles that they would like to learn. These days, there is sheet music available for most songs and I also make arrangements from time to time, to suit particular playing abilities. It is imporant to learn music that you want to play in order to get maximum enjoyment and continued motivation in your lessons. (so many adults can recall being sent to piano lessons as a child and being forced to play music which they didn’t really enjoy or connect with - resulting in them giving up, but now wishing they had stuck at it)
Piano Lessons in Ratho
© Paul Chamberlain 2016
www.rathopianolessons.co.uk
Piano lessons in Edinburgh. Piano lessons in Ratho, Piano lessons in Kirkliston, Piano lessons in Newbridge, Piano lessons in South Queensferry,Piano lessons in Corstorphine, Piano lessons in Barnton, Piano lessons in Blackhall, Piano lessons in Comely Bank, Piano lessons in Cramond, Piano lessons in Davidsons Mains, Piano lessons in Cragleith, Piano lessons in Granton, Piano lessons in Silverknowes, Piano lessons in Sighthill, Piano lessons in Currie, Piano lessons in Balerno, Piano lessons in Currie, Piano lessons in Juniper Green, Piano lessons in Colinton, Piano lessons in Slateford, Piano lessons in Gorgie, Piano lessons in Dalry, Piano lessons in Saughton, Piano lessons in Longstone, Piano lessons in Livingston, Piano Lessons in Kirknewton, Plessons in West Lothian, Piano lessons in Chesser, Piano lessons in Greenbank, Piano lessons in East Craigs, Piano lessons in Drum Brae, Piano lessons in Clermiston,
All levels and styles taught From beginners to advanced All ages welcome from 5 years up Fun lessons with friendly experienced teacher

FAQS

What is the best age to start learning to play the piano

I teach students from the age of 5. Some children are more mature than others at this age and it really depends on their ability to focus on particular tasks for a period of time. I use a mixture of musical games, apps and listening activities alongside the playing which enage the student and make the lesson a fun, educational and rewarding experience. Many people decide to take up the piano inlater life or return to lessons after having a family, retirement etc. I can tailor the lessons to fit your individual situation and make sure you get what you want to out of it, whether you have a particular goal, or just wish to play or your own enjoyment. How often should I practice the piano This is a difficult question to answer as it varies from person to person. The most imporant thing is to make your practise as regular as possible. Ideally for younger children something like 10 minutes per day will result in a positive progression. As they get a little bit older then this can be increased. Finding a way of fitting it into the daily routine so that the motiviation to practise is maintained will be beneficial. Practisincg effectively is also imporant to make the most out of the time and will yield greater results than just playing the pieces through from start to finish each time. For adults, the pressures of life such as work, family, social events, can make finding a regular practise time tricky, but again trying to practise little and often rather than one big session just before a lesson will be much better.

Do I have to take exams

Sitting formal exams such as the ABRSM Exams (Associated Board of the Royal Schools of Music) is entirely up to you. Exams can be a great way to provide motivation, and a continual development path as you learn the piano. Apart from bringing pieces up to a high standard of performance, they also include technical elements such as scales, sight reading, and aural tests. For those that wish to sit ABRSM exams, I am very happy to focus lessons towards this but equally it is absolutely your choice whether to follow an exam route or not.  For younger students looking to study at university, music exams can earn UCAS points towards your application.

Are Scales important

Yes scales, arpeggios, and other exercises help to develop technique, strenghten fingers and become familliar with playing in different keys. They should form a warm-up at the start of each practise session and over time will enable you to play fast, accurately and in a relaxed manner. Think of them as the equivalent of warm-ups and training in the gym done by athletes to keep them in shape.

Does it matter it I have a real piano, electric piano, or

keyboard

Ideally an accoustic piano or high quality digital piano is best, but a keyboard is fine to start off with before you make the comittment to invest in a piano. The advantage of a digital piano is that you can practise with headphones, they are more portable and don’t require tuning, however they will never completely replicate the touch and feel of an accoustic piano. If you ave a real piano, ideally it should be tuned 2 or 3 times a year depending on how much is is played.

Can I choose which music to play

Yes I actively encourage students to let me know if there are particular pieces or styles that they would like to learn. These days, there is sheet music available for most songs and I also make arrangements from time to time, to suit particular playing abilities. It is imporant to learn music that you want to play in order to get maximum enjoyment and continued motivation in your lessons. (so many adults can recall being sent to piano lessons as a child and being forced to play music which they didn’t really enjoy or connect with - resulting in them giving up, but now wishing they had stuck at it)
Ratho Piano Lessons